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I just love me my snapchat filters—it’s like a fairy touched my face 🧚🏻‍♀️💅 #yesimextra #butthesefilterstho #admiringart #selfiesession #거짓말이야
🦋🎨🖋✨✨🦋🎨🖋 Divertirse mientras admiramos y aprendemos deja huellas profundas. Linda noche para todos. ©️Cecilia Niebla #funny #art #pose #colgatesmile #sonrisa #divertirse #arteypoesía #cubana #cubanosporelmundo #latinos #argentina  #italia #internationalart #admiringart #learningaboutart #arte #mexico #florida #photography #fotografía
'admire more, most people don't admire enought'
#admiringart
(un grazie alla ph: @sssegreti)
'admire more, most people don't admire enought' #admiringart  (un grazie alla ph: @sssegreti)
#aboutlastnight #shoutouts to @mrsneakersavage for his #artgallery / #popupshop in #NewRochelle #NY last night in #TheLab he had some #dopepieces which I’ll be posting more of later but I had to get a pic of the kid #admiringart #art I’m a man of #manytastes but this pic was #fortheculture oh yeah that’s my #favoritesweater #beardgang #losflyboysinc✈ oh by the way #read the piece of art that #caption is CRAAAAAZY lol no really #lolipop
we came across this awesome poster today #stay_k #verycool #nicosia #posterdesign #admiringart #sweetdesign
Still life perspective by a local artist 👨‍🎨🎨
Still life perspective by a local artist 👨‍🎨🎨
• “The Three Sisters: Finette (‘Delicate’), Babillarde (‘Gabby’), and Nonchalante (‘Lazybones’)” (1824) by Jean-Antoine Laurent • “This is an example of the Troubadour painting movement, which treated subjects from France’s National past from the Middle Ages to the 17th century in an anecdotal manner. The scene is based on a 17th-century tale by the wit Marie-Jean L’Héritier de Villandon.” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “The Three Sisters: Finette (‘Delicate’), Babillarde (‘Gabby’), and Nonchalante (‘Lazybones’)” (1824) by Jean-Antoine Laurent • “This is an example of the Troubadour painting movement, which treated subjects from France’s National past from the Middle Ages to the 17th century in an anecdotal manner. The scene is based on a 17th-century tale by the wit Marie-Jean L’Héritier de Villandon.” —gallery sign #admiringart 
• “Madonna and Child Enthroned with Saints” (15th century) by the Bruges Master of 1499 • “Representations of the Madonna with female saints were popular in 15th-century Bruges...In this charming ideal vision of a world without sin, the artist inserted many details symbolizing the ultimate virtue of the Virgin and her entourage.” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “Madonna and Child Enthroned with Saints” (15th century) by the Bruges Master of 1499 • “Representations of the Madonna with female saints were popular in 15th-century Bruges...In this charming ideal vision of a world without sin, the artist inserted many details symbolizing the ultimate virtue of the Virgin and her entourage.” —gallery sign #admiringart 
Who wouldn’t love this?  #art brings it all together. #artist #admiringart #artwork #artistsoninstagram #gypsy #gypsylife #gypsyart #nomad #plantbased #livefree
• “Torre di Schiavi” (1865) by Thomas Hiram Hotchkiss • “The landscape where this herdsman sleeps recalls a distant time and place. Thomas Hotchkiss heightened the mystery of this ancient site by including a mosaic of a winged boy on a dolphin from a recently excavated Roman bath as well as a human skull and bones excavated from a necropolis, an ancient burial ground. The Torre di Schiavi, or Tower of Slaves, was a popular subject for American artists visiting Italy. The site was associated with an uprising of Roman slaves, an event that would have touched a resonant chord for Americans in 1865, when the Civil War ended and the Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery.”—gallery sign #admiringart
• “Torre di Schiavi” (1865) by Thomas Hiram Hotchkiss • “The landscape where this herdsman sleeps recalls a distant time and place. Thomas Hotchkiss heightened the mystery of this ancient site by including a mosaic of a winged boy on a dolphin from a recently excavated Roman bath as well as a human skull and bones excavated from a necropolis, an ancient burial ground. The Torre di Schiavi, or Tower of Slaves, was a popular subject for American artists visiting Italy. The site was associated with an uprising of Roman slaves, an event that would have touched a resonant chord for Americans in 1865, when the Civil War ended and the Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery.”—gallery sign #admiringart 
I fell in love with the larger than life size sculptures of Paolo Del Toro. Wish I could see them in person. Here are my (fill in adjective here) attempts at recreating them in my sketchbook. .
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@pdtoro #admiringart #quickdrawing #watercolor #sketchbook #sketch #penandink #indiaink #watercolorpencils #drawingaday #paper #seeing #drawing #draw #dailydrawing #dailydraw #art #art🎨 #coloringtime
• Part of “Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii” (1995-1996) by Nam June Paik • “When Nam June Paik came to the United States in 1964, the interstate highway system was only nine years old, and superhighways offered everyone the freedom to ‘see the U.S.A. in your Chevrolet.’ Walking along the entire length of this installation suggests the enormous scale of the nation that confronted the young Korean artist when he arrived. Neon outlines the monitors, recalling the multicolored maps and glowing enticements of motels and restaurants that beckoned Americans to the open road. The different colors remind us that individual states still have distinct identities and cultures, even in today's information age.” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart
• Part of “Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii” (1995-1996) by Nam June Paik • “When Nam June Paik came to the United States in 1964, the interstate highway system was only nine years old, and superhighways offered everyone the freedom to ‘see the U.S.A. in your Chevrolet.’ Walking along the entire length of this installation suggests the enormous scale of the nation that confronted the young Korean artist when he arrived. Neon outlines the monitors, recalling the multicolored maps and glowing enticements of motels and restaurants that beckoned Americans to the open road. The different colors remind us that individual states still have distinct identities and cultures, even in today's information age.” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart 
• “After Them” (1928) by Walter Ufer • “Born in Louisville, Kentucky, and trained as a lithographer, Ufer decided on a painting career after visiting the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. He began his studies in Hamburg and then moved on to the Royal Academy in Dresden. In 1900 he took up commerical art and portrait painting in Chicago, but he went to Munich in 1911 for further study. When he returned, his talent attracted former Chicago mayor Carter Harrison, who offered to susidize a trip to Taos in 1914. There Ufer soon abandoned studio methods in favor of working outdoors in direct sunlight. His favorite subjects were Indians absorbed in their daily activities or traveling across the brilliant landscape. In 1920 he became the first Taos artist to win a prize at the Carnegie International, and through the rest of the decade his dazzling brand of Impressionism retained considerable appeal. The Depression and a waning interest in Indian subjects affected Ufer's work during the 1930s, however, and he never regained his previous reputation.” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart
• “After Them” (1928) by Walter Ufer • “Born in Louisville, Kentucky, and trained as a lithographer, Ufer decided on a painting career after visiting the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. He began his studies in Hamburg and then moved on to the Royal Academy in Dresden. In 1900 he took up commerical art and portrait painting in Chicago, but he went to Munich in 1911 for further study. When he returned, his talent attracted former Chicago mayor Carter Harrison, who offered to susidize a trip to Taos in 1914. There Ufer soon abandoned studio methods in favor of working outdoors in direct sunlight. His favorite subjects were Indians absorbed in their daily activities or traveling across the brilliant landscape. In 1920 he became the first Taos artist to win a prize at the Carnegie International, and through the rest of the decade his dazzling brand of Impressionism retained considerable appeal. The Depression and a waning interest in Indian subjects affected Ufer's work during the 1930s, however, and he never regained his previous reputation.” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart 
#the100dayproject. Day 11/100. Tahoe clouds (caution artist rendering do not try this at home!).The most inspiring thing on my drive from CA to CO-clouds at Lake Tahoe.
#the100dayproject . Day 11/100. Tahoe clouds (caution artist rendering do not try this at home!).The most inspiring thing on my drive from CA to CO-clouds at Lake Tahoe.
• “Split” (1959) by Kenneth Noland • “Kenneth Noland studied at Black Mountain College in North Carolina, a school that encouraged experimental art. Well into the 1950s, the college supported artists of all kinds, from painters who wanted to dance to musicians who wanted to sculpt. In 1949, Noland moved to Washington and was inspired by the work of European artists he saw while ‘going to church’ at the Phillips Collection. He discovered abstract expressionism and began experimenting with unprimed canvases and unusual methods of applying paint. He and the artist Morris Louis had ‘jam sessions,’ in which they painted together and bounced ideas off one another. Noland adopted the circle as a way to make a ‘single expressive entity,’ and often applied thinned paint to unprimed canvas in a rapid ‘one shot’ attempt to get it right.” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart
• “Split” (1959) by Kenneth Noland • “Kenneth Noland studied at Black Mountain College in North Carolina, a school that encouraged experimental art. Well into the 1950s, the college supported artists of all kinds, from painters who wanted to dance to musicians who wanted to sculpt. In 1949, Noland moved to Washington and was inspired by the work of European artists he saw while ‘going to church’ at the Phillips Collection. He discovered abstract expressionism and began experimenting with unprimed canvases and unusual methods of applying paint. He and the artist Morris Louis had ‘jam sessions,’ in which they painted together and bounced ideas off one another. Noland adopted the circle as a way to make a ‘single expressive entity,’ and often applied thinned paint to unprimed canvas in a rapid ‘one shot’ attempt to get it right.” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart 
I’m SO excited to see what a few local artists are putting together in Tampa! It’s even MORE exciting when you run into the artist while admiring their work 😍
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🎨 : @artist_esh
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#admiringart #art #artist #artists #artistic #artwork #artsy #artsyfartsy #artistlife #artporn #artgram #artnerd #artlife #artislife #artlover #artistatwork #graffiti #paint #painting #painter #mural #tampa #tampaart #tampaflorida #florida #instaart #instaarts #instaartist #instaartists #instaartwork
I’m SO excited to see what a few local artists are putting together in Tampa! It’s even MORE exciting when you run into the artist while admiring their work 😍 • 🎨 : @artist_esh • • • #admiringart  #art  #artist  #artists  #artistic  #artwork  #artsy  #artsyfartsy  #artistlife  #artporn  #artgram  #artnerd  #artlife  #artislife  #artlover  #artistatwork  #graffiti  #paint  #painting  #painter  #mural  #tampa  #tampaart  #tampaflorida  #florida  #instaart  #instaarts  #instaartist  #instaartists  #instaartwork 
The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls. -Picasso #art #admiringart
The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls. -Picasso #art  #admiringart 
• “San Francisco West Side Ridge” (2001) by Wayne Thiebaud • “Wayne Thiebaud was fascinated by dramatic vistas and abrupt disjunctions of the San Francisco landscape. Denying the laws of normal perspective, ‘San Francisco West Side Ridge,’ is a commotion of rectangles, horizontals, and diagonals that thrust downward and obliquely to destabilize streets and urban buildings. Parked vehicles seemed pinned to verticals curbs; turrets, palm trees, and a tiny figure on a balcony confirm life at the top of the precipice; and shadows cast by street lamps point like arrows to the dramatic drop-off at the right.” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “San Francisco West Side Ridge” (2001) by Wayne Thiebaud • “Wayne Thiebaud was fascinated by dramatic vistas and abrupt disjunctions of the San Francisco landscape. Denying the laws of normal perspective, ‘San Francisco West Side Ridge,’ is a commotion of rectangles, horizontals, and diagonals that thrust downward and obliquely to destabilize streets and urban buildings. Parked vehicles seemed pinned to verticals curbs; turrets, palm trees, and a tiny figure on a balcony confirm life at the top of the precipice; and shadows cast by street lamps point like arrows to the dramatic drop-off at the right.” —gallery sign #admiringart 
• “The Necklace” (c. 1907) by Thomas Wilmer Dewing • “Verdant, mysterious, and peopled with attractive, classically dressed women, Dewing's paintings provided fixed points of truth and beauty for a turn-of-the-century generation fearing the great changes in American culture...” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart
• “The Necklace” (c. 1907) by Thomas Wilmer Dewing • “Verdant, mysterious, and peopled with attractive, classically dressed women, Dewing's paintings provided fixed points of truth and beauty for a turn-of-the-century generation fearing the great changes in American culture...” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart 
There’s a saying that goes ‘There’s always a first time for everything.’ At some point in my life, I realized I have done things I never thought I would do in the past. That’s why I can say there is no certainty in life. We might not like to do something now but we will probably do it in the future. The experience I went through today was undeniably amazing, though.
#eyeofinside #senseofart #firsttime #firsttimeever #admiringart #exhibition #paintings #nofilter
There’s a saying that goes ‘There’s always a first time for everything.’ At some point in my life, I realized I have done things I never thought I would do in the past. That’s why I can say there is no certainty in life. We might not like to do something now but we will probably do it in the future. The experience I went through today was undeniably amazing, though. #eyeofinside  #senseofart  #firsttime  #firsttimeever  #admiringart  #exhibition  #paintings  #nofilter 
Art Walk Downtown Chattanooga
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#art #walk #downtown #chattanooga #tennessee #yellow #cousins #admiringart #walnutstreetbridge #bluffviewartdistrict #bluffviewbakery #theedwinhotel #huntermuseum @huntermuseum @bluffviewbakery
• “Levee Farms” (1998) by Wayne Thiebaud • “The vantage point of ‘Levee Farms’ is that of a low-flying bird as it surveys planting fields and a river suffused with the warm light of the California sun. A tour de force of curving lines, gentle color, and subtle shadows describe fields that follow the contours of the river as it flows toward the delta. Here, Thiebaud toys with perspective—there is no horizon line, for example—and manipulates space to celebrate the confluence of man in harmony with the natural world.” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “Levee Farms” (1998) by Wayne Thiebaud • “The vantage point of ‘Levee Farms’ is that of a low-flying bird as it surveys planting fields and a river suffused with the warm light of the California sun. A tour de force of curving lines, gentle color, and subtle shadows describe fields that follow the contours of the river as it flows toward the delta. Here, Thiebaud toys with perspective—there is no horizon line, for example—and manipulates space to celebrate the confluence of man in harmony with the natural world.” —gallery sign #admiringart 
#the100dayproject.  9/100. “Bruce”  Don’t know why i am calling this guy Bruce.  I found him in a magazine begging to thrown out into the internet.  Enjoy.
#the100dayproject . 9/100. “Bruce” Don’t know why i am calling this guy Bruce. I found him in a magazine begging to thrown out into the internet. Enjoy.
• “Elk-Foot of the Taos Tribe” (1909) by Eanger Irving Couse • “In 1886, after attending classes at the Art Institute of Chicago and Art Students League in New York, Couse went to Europe, where he remained for nearly ten years. While in Paris he studied with the academic master Adolphe Bouguereau and exhibited frequently at the Salon. He first became interested in western subject matter after visiting his father-in-law's sheep ranch in Oregon. In 1902 artists Ernest Blumenschein and Joseph Henry Sharp invited him to Taos, New Mexico, where in 1909 he established a studio, dividing his time between the Southwest and New York. Couse concentrated primarily on monumental Indian subjects. When he died in 1936, he was among the best-known of the Taos school artists, having produced more than fifteen hundred oil paintings.” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart
• “Elk-Foot of the Taos Tribe” (1909) by Eanger Irving Couse • “In 1886, after attending classes at the Art Institute of Chicago and Art Students League in New York, Couse went to Europe, where he remained for nearly ten years. While in Paris he studied with the academic master Adolphe Bouguereau and exhibited frequently at the Salon. He first became interested in western subject matter after visiting his father-in-law's sheep ranch in Oregon. In 1902 artists Ernest Blumenschein and Joseph Henry Sharp invited him to Taos, New Mexico, where in 1909 he established a studio, dividing his time between the Southwest and New York. Couse concentrated primarily on monumental Indian subjects. When he died in 1936, he was among the best-known of the Taos school artists, having produced more than fifteen hundred oil paintings.” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart 
• “US Highway 1” (1962) by Allan D’Arcangelo • “Allan D'Arcangelo has long been considered a leading figure among the first generation of American Pop artists...’US Highway 1’ is a seminal work in D'Arcangelo's oeuvre and a prime example of his signature compositional format: a long strip of asphalt cutting through the landscape and plunging toward a vanishing point on the distant horizon. Dark green silhouettes of trees flank the two-lane highway. The sky above is a solid plane of dark blue. The space is both flat and penetrating. Signs along the highway appear to float over the road as if time has been suspended. This surreal, almost dreamlike quality indicates a major difference between D'Arcangelo's conception of the highway and road imagery presented to the American public by writers such as Jack Kerouac and photographers like Robert Frank. The latter see the road as a place where things happen, where rites of passage occur and stories unfold. For D'Arcangelo, the road is a place without time and without characters—just the hypnotic repetition of road signs and billboards and the forward motion of the car.” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart
• “US Highway 1” (1962) by Allan D’Arcangelo • “Allan D'Arcangelo has long been considered a leading figure among the first generation of American Pop artists...’US Highway 1’ is a seminal work in D'Arcangelo's oeuvre and a prime example of his signature compositional format: a long strip of asphalt cutting through the landscape and plunging toward a vanishing point on the distant horizon. Dark green silhouettes of trees flank the two-lane highway. The sky above is a solid plane of dark blue. The space is both flat and penetrating. Signs along the highway appear to float over the road as if time has been suspended. This surreal, almost dreamlike quality indicates a major difference between D'Arcangelo's conception of the highway and road imagery presented to the American public by writers such as Jack Kerouac and photographers like Robert Frank. The latter see the road as a place where things happen, where rites of passage occur and stories unfold. For D'Arcangelo, the road is a place without time and without characters—just the hypnotic repetition of road signs and billboards and the forward motion of the car.” —americanart.si.edu #admiringart 
“ If you ask me what I came into this life to do, I an Artist, will tell you: I am here to live out loud. “ ~ Zola 💕
#admiringArt
#meandmyRedBeret 
#imanArtist and #imMaarte 💁🏻‍♀️
#proudofmyroots 
#museumLove
#happiestplaceonearth 
#masterpiece 
#NationalmuseumCardiff 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿
• “Pleistocene Skeleton” (1970) by Nancy Graves • “‘Pleistocene Skeleton’ plays with perceptions of what is natural and what is invented. Nancy Graves sculpted this deceptively realistic skeleton based on the internal structure of a camel. Graves's abiding fascination with these unique creatures (and nature more generally) began during her childhood visits to the local natural history museum where her father worked. In later years, Graves traveled to North Africa where she observed and filmed herds of camels.” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “Pleistocene Skeleton” (1970) by Nancy Graves • “‘Pleistocene Skeleton’ plays with perceptions of what is natural and what is invented. Nancy Graves sculpted this deceptively realistic skeleton based on the internal structure of a camel. Graves's abiding fascination with these unique creatures (and nature more generally) began during her childhood visits to the local natural history museum where her father worked. In later years, Graves traveled to North Africa where she observed and filmed herds of camels.” —gallery sign #admiringart 
Saw pleasant paintings of some thoughts ✌️🤘 #siwey #mistahpresident #comosehacepato #admiringart #dowmtownsd #paintings #kimjongun #doncuetes
• “The Sleeping Cavalier” (1660-1663) by Jacob Ochtervelt • “Ochtervelt freely borrowed motifs from various contemporary painters in composing his works. In this instance, he adapts Ter Borch’s playful image of a slumbering soldier...for his own slumbering cavalier. He also added a humorous note: the rude awakening the soldier is about to receive from a trumpet held to his ear.” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “The Sleeping Cavalier” (1660-1663) by Jacob Ochtervelt • “Ochtervelt freely borrowed motifs from various contemporary painters in composing his works. In this instance, he adapts Ter Borch’s playful image of a slumbering soldier...for his own slumbering cavalier. He also added a humorous note: the rude awakening the soldier is about to receive from a trumpet held to his ear.” —gallery sign #admiringart 
‘Young man admiring the art’ @christiesinteriors ‘Bright Young Things’ themed auction of furniture and art work from Farringdon House, previously owned by Lord Berners @christiesinc #brightyoungthings #admiringart #englishcountryhouseinteriors #lordbernersandrobertheberpercy #lordberners #auction #auctioneers #underthehammer #faringdonhouse
• “Jackpot Machine” (1962) by Wayne Thiebaud • “In ‘Jackpot Machine,’ creamy strokes of red, white, and blue invite the viewer to follow the American dream, grab the handle, and get rich quick. But only two of three tokens line up, pointing out how random success can be. Thiebaud painted ‘Jackpot Machine’ just as he broke into the national art scene after years of working as a commercial artist and teacher. The painting’s bold lines and rich surface exemplify Thiebaud’s belief that ‘painting is more important than art.’” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “Jackpot Machine” (1962) by Wayne Thiebaud • “In ‘Jackpot Machine,’ creamy strokes of red, white, and blue invite the viewer to follow the American dream, grab the handle, and get rich quick. But only two of three tokens line up, pointing out how random success can be. Thiebaud painted ‘Jackpot Machine’ just as he broke into the national art scene after years of working as a commercial artist and teacher. The painting’s bold lines and rich surface exemplify Thiebaud’s belief that ‘painting is more important than art.’” —gallery sign #admiringart 
💭 I wonder how long it takes for them to curl their hair in the morning? #artisticthoughts #admiringart
• “Still Life” (c. 1640-1650) by Jan Davidsz. de Heem • “Elaborate still lifes featuring luxurious and exotic objects from around the world became popular after 1640. This generation of prosperous Dutch citizens looked at worldly goods less suspiciously than their parents had—hey enjoyed wealth and sophistication represented by expensive imports such as the African gray parrot shown here. Antwerp, where de Heem moved in 1636, was the most active market for such paintings; its citizens had never been as strict as their Calvinist neighbors.” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “Still Life” (c. 1640-1650) by Jan Davidsz. de Heem • “Elaborate still lifes featuring luxurious and exotic objects from around the world became popular after 1640. This generation of prosperous Dutch citizens looked at worldly goods less suspiciously than their parents had—hey enjoyed wealth and sophistication represented by expensive imports such as the African gray parrot shown here. Antwerp, where de Heem moved in 1636, was the most active market for such paintings; its citizens had never been as strict as their Calvinist neighbors.” —gallery sign #admiringart 
WOW! This is fabulous!  I do love a ball and claw foot!  #ballandclaw  @inspirationsrdu 
#Repost @admiring_art with @get_repost
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• Lamp Leg • “Almost all historical sources believe that the Ball and Claw design was derived from the Chinese: a dragon’s claw grasping a crystal ball, or a pearl, or sometimes a scared, flaming jewel. In Chinese mythology, the dragon (Emperor) would be guarding (with the triple claw foot) the symbol (ball – for wisdom, or purity) from evil forces trying to steal it... English cabinetmakers are credited with transforming the dragon’s claw into a bird’s talon or a lion’s paw; the lion representing English authority.” —furniturelibrary.com #admiringart
WOW! This is fabulous! I do love a ball and claw foot! #ballandclaw  @inspirationsrdu #Repost  @admiring_art with @get_repost ・・・ • Lamp Leg • “Almost all historical sources believe that the Ball and Claw design was derived from the Chinese: a dragon’s claw grasping a crystal ball, or a pearl, or sometimes a scared, flaming jewel. In Chinese mythology, the dragon (Emperor) would be guarding (with the triple claw foot) the symbol (ball – for wisdom, or purity) from evil forces trying to steal it... English cabinetmakers are credited with transforming the dragon’s claw into a bird’s talon or a lion’s paw; the lion representing English authority.” —furniturelibrary.com #admiringart 
• “Woman at a Mirror” (c. 1650-1652) by Gerard ter Borch • “Mirrors were an essential part of upscale Dutch interiors and appear with regularity in genre scenes, usually where women are dressing themselves for the day. Having both positive and negative associations, mirrors could symbolize truth and the sense of sight, but also vanity and the transience of love. Artists thought carefully about how to paint mirrored reflections and how they could expand the narrative possibilities of a scene. Mirrors could reveal the expression of someone whose face is hidden from the viewer, opening up a private moment, or they could add emotional depth to a scene by showing a fleeting look of care or concern from a different angle, doubling the effect.” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “Woman at a Mirror” (c. 1650-1652) by Gerard ter Borch • “Mirrors were an essential part of upscale Dutch interiors and appear with regularity in genre scenes, usually where women are dressing themselves for the day. Having both positive and negative associations, mirrors could symbolize truth and the sense of sight, but also vanity and the transience of love. Artists thought carefully about how to paint mirrored reflections and how they could expand the narrative possibilities of a scene. Mirrors could reveal the expression of someone whose face is hidden from the viewer, opening up a private moment, or they could add emotional depth to a scene by showing a fleeting look of care or concern from a different angle, doubling the effect.” —gallery sign #admiringart 
Spring rains, oil on canvas, 40 x 40
Fresh out of the studio today
Spring rains, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 Fresh out of the studio today
From👇🏽macro👇🏽to🔎👆🏼micro👆🏼🔍 DETAIL: From Hercules Series: The Apple Tree 🍐🍊🍎🐍 #ABEEarewe #tapestorialsculpture #artofnow #emergingartist #heytate  #tapestorialdetail #artdetail #artupclose #mythinart #humans #tapestrydetail #tapestry #eve #embroidery #21stcenturytapestry #kingtutthread #tapis #artoftheday #contemporarytapestry #artextil #juxtapoz #wowxwow #notflat From Hercules Series: The Apple Tree tapestry 15’x17’w as seen further down in feed. ABEEarewe.com A BEE: Cars Houseman+Darka Novoselic @darburynovoselic #admiringart
From👇🏽macro👇🏽to🔎👆🏼micro👆🏼🔍 DETAIL: From Hercules Series: The Apple Tree 🍐🍊🍎🐍 #ABEEarewe  #tapestorialsculpture  #artofnow  #emergingartist  #heytate  #tapestorialdetail  #artdetail  #artupclose  #mythinart  #humans  #tapestrydetail  #tapestry  #eve  #embroidery  #21stcenturytapestry  #kingtutthread  #tapis  #artoftheday  #contemporarytapestry  #artextil  #juxtapoz  #wowxwow  #notflat  From Hercules Series: The Apple Tree tapestry 15’x17’w as seen further down in feed. ABEEarewe.com A BEE: Cars Houseman+Darka Novoselic @darburynovoselic #admiringart 
From👇🏽macro👇🏽to🔎👆🏼micro👆🏼🔍 DETAIL: Rise (work in progress)🔥⚡️👸🏻 #ABEEarewe #tapestorialsculpture #heytate #emergingartist #tapestorialdetail #artdetail #artupclose #mythinart #humans #tapestrydetail #tapestry #rise #embroidery #artoftheday #21stcenturytapestry #artofnow #kingtutthread #tapis #wip #contemporarytapestry #artextil #juxtapoz #wowxwow #notflat ABEEarewe.com A BEE: Cars Houseman+Darka Novoselic @darburynovoselic #admiringart
From👇🏽macro👇🏽to🔎👆🏼micro👆🏼🔍 DETAIL: Rise (work in progress)🔥⚡️👸🏻 #ABEEarewe  #tapestorialsculpture  #heytate  #emergingartist  #tapestorialdetail  #artdetail  #artupclose  #mythinart  #humans  #tapestrydetail  #tapestry  #rise  #embroidery  #artoftheday  #21stcenturytapestry  #artofnow  #kingtutthread  #tapis  #wip  #contemporarytapestry  #artextil  #juxtapoz  #wowxwow  #notflat  ABEEarewe.com A BEE: Cars Houseman+Darka Novoselic @darburynovoselic #admiringart 
From👇🏽macro👇🏽 to 🔎👆🏼micro👆🏼🔍 DETAIL: Forest Queene🌿👸🏻 #ABEEarewe #tapestorialsculpture #hamadryad #tapestorialdetail #artdetail #heytate #artupclose #mythinart #humans #tapestrydetail #tapestry #artofnow #embroidery #21stcenturytapestry #emergingartist #kingtutthread #tapis #artoftheday #admiringart #contemporarytapestry #artextil #juxtapoz #wowxwow #notflat Forest Queene tapestry 16’x21’w as seen further down in feed. ABEEarewe.com A BEE: Cars Houseman+Darka Novoselic @darburynovoselic
From👇🏽macro👇🏽 to 🔎👆🏼micro👆🏼🔍 DETAIL: Forest Queene🌿👸🏻 #ABEEarewe  #tapestorialsculpture  #hamadryad  #tapestorialdetail  #artdetail  #heytate  #artupclose  #mythinart  #humans  #tapestrydetail  #tapestry  #artofnow  #embroidery  #21stcenturytapestry  #emergingartist  #kingtutthread  #tapis  #artoftheday  #admiringart  #contemporarytapestry  #artextil  #juxtapoz  #wowxwow  #notflat  Forest Queene tapestry 16’x21’w as seen further down in feed. ABEEarewe.com A BEE: Cars Houseman+Darka Novoselic @darburynovoselic
• “Jonah” (c. 1885-1895) by Albert Pinkham Ryder • “‘Jonah’ is one of Albert Pinkham Ryder’s most densely painted canvases. He reworked this image so many times that he paint layers are still soft to the touch after more than a century. Ryder chose a biblical tale of damnation, terror, and salvation that suited his poetic temperament and his manner of working. He was a thoughtful and literate painter who often found himself waiting for inspiration to strike. When the moment came, Ryder gave himself over to the act of painting, stopping only to gather his energy and courage. We imagine his brush sweeping and turning through the thick paint, much as Jonah struggled in he ocean’s pitching waves. American artists a generation later were inspired by Ryder’s mythic themes and vigorous painting. His example helped them to create a new art for the American century.” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “Jonah” (c. 1885-1895) by Albert Pinkham Ryder • “‘Jonah’ is one of Albert Pinkham Ryder’s most densely painted canvases. He reworked this image so many times that he paint layers are still soft to the touch after more than a century. Ryder chose a biblical tale of damnation, terror, and salvation that suited his poetic temperament and his manner of working. He was a thoughtful and literate painter who often found himself waiting for inspiration to strike. When the moment came, Ryder gave himself over to the act of painting, stopping only to gather his energy and courage. We imagine his brush sweeping and turning through the thick paint, much as Jonah struggled in he ocean’s pitching waves. American artists a generation later were inspired by Ryder’s mythic themes and vigorous painting. His example helped them to create a new art for the American century.” —gallery sign #admiringart 
• “Interior of the Church of St. Laurens in Rotterdam” (c. 1657) by Anthonie de Lorme • “Paintings of church interiors were popular in the northern Netherlands as they underscored a major difference in religious practices between the southern and northern regions. While Catholics in the southern Netherlands commissioned paintings to decorate their churches, Calvinist in the north rejected the use of paintings for devotion, considering them idolatrous. Shields and banners representing the devoted parishioners punctuated the whitewashed walls of their churches instead. 
Church interior paintings often include dogs. A common sight in churches at the time, dogs likely conveyed a moral message: as a counterpoint to the dog relieving himself against the church wall (left), humans should respect the church and its promise of salvation. Though church interior paintings do not represent a specific religious subject to be used for devotion, they undoubtedly inspired religious contemplation and reminded viewers of the importance and beauty of such holy places.” —gallery sign #admiringart
• “Interior of the Church of St. Laurens in Rotterdam” (c. 1657) by Anthonie de Lorme • “Paintings of church interiors were popular in the northern Netherlands as they underscored a major difference in religious practices between the southern and northern regions. While Catholics in the southern Netherlands commissioned paintings to decorate their churches, Calvinist in the north rejected the use of paintings for devotion, considering them idolatrous. Shields and banners representing the devoted parishioners punctuated the whitewashed walls of their churches instead. Church interior paintings often include dogs. A common sight in churches at the time, dogs likely conveyed a moral message: as a counterpoint to the dog relieving himself against the church wall (left), humans should respect the church and its promise of salvation. Though church interior paintings do not represent a specific religious subject to be used for devotion, they undoubtedly inspired religious contemplation and reminded viewers of the importance and beauty of such holy places.” —gallery sign #admiringart